Bucket Lists, Careers, and The Meaning of Life: Why Do You Do What You Do?

??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????What’s on Your Bucket List?

Recently, a friend asked me what’s on my bucket list. He began to name some things on his—mostly travel to various places. I couldn’t think of a place I need to see in my lifetime, though there are a few places I’d like to go. Go or not, I’ll be happy.

Or not.

I no longer have a specific career goal on my bucket list either. Over the last few decades, I wanted to be a noted psychologist, a bestselling novelist, and a nutritionist. I imagined changing people’s lives with my insights and ability to motivate my clients to live a healthy lifestyle.

A more recent career goal (before I became a freelancer writer), was to be an awesome teacher to a special population of kids I really understood. Let’s just say politics got in the way of that goal.

But like I said, I no longer dream of accomplishing a specific career-related goal. I now see how all of these pursuits fit together.

There are a lot of things I’d like to learn—or relearn—before I leave this planet. I’d like to sing again, play tennis again, and I’ve always wanted to learn to draw. I have to learn about technology and digital publishing (but none of that is on my bucket list).

In fact, I’ll be fine if I accomplish any of these things or none of them, as long as I stay engaged in something.

A simple goal: Finding the meaning of life

So what is on my bucket list? What do I need in order to feel that my life has been worthwhile?

Well, it’s simple. I need to know—or believe, because we never really know anything, do we?—that my life has had meaning and that I’ve somehow made a positive difference. Isn’t that what most of us want.

Can I ever know for sure that my life means something? Maybe not. It may have to be enough to just believe. In many ways, I have yoga thank for knowing what’s enough. Yoga has taught me to be myself and to use my gifts without attachment to the outcome of my efforts.

It’s hard though. I won’t lie.

Making a difference

I suppose it’s obvious for some people that they’ve made a difference in the world, and it must feel good to know this. Respected doctors, best-selling authors, Noble Peace Prize winners and the like get some kind of tangible feedback and proof that their lives have meant something.

Do I need to be famous or remembered in history books? Of course not. Does it matter much that I may not be personally remembered by many once I’m gone? Not really, though it would be nice. But I do want to believe I made a small difference somehow. Because a small difference can have a huge impact. It can be part of a whole movement toward the development of good. I know in my heart that this is true, though I can’t point to any scientific evidence to support my hunch.

Your Career is Not What You Do, But Why and How You Do It

The other day in yoga class, my teacher, who always seems to know exactly what I need to hear, read a passage from Marianne Williamson’s bestseller, A Return to Love.  The book is a classic for good reason. It’s simple and brilliantly poetic. It’s about love.

The passage my yoga teacher read was about, of all things, careers. How did she know I’d been wondering about the direction of mine?

My friend who asked me the bucket list question is struggling with a similar problem. He’s at a career crossroad himself. The career thing is very different for him than it is for me in some ways. But in others it’s not. We both want to make a difference.

How to Make a Difference

How can we make a difference in such a complicated society? We have so many choices. On the other hand, as we explore each possibility, we often find our choices are, in reality, remarkably limited. They may lead us down dead end roads until we hit a wall.

And then what?

There is fierce competition for jobs, whether one is a corporate executive or a freelancer looking for her next gig. There is so much that seems irrelevant and pointless when it comes to using our gifts. Are we “qualified,” are we “certified,” do we have experience in a very specific field we know we can succeed in?

Simply using our gifts is not always enough—because of the competition, the bills, the tax laws, the stock market, and information overload. Every day my inbox is bombarded with the latest “secret” for finding clients and well-paying writing gigs. Most of them are regurgitations of the ones I received the week before. At this point in my career, few of them are useful.

But I shift through them all to find that needle in the haystack. Because there still needles to find.

My point (I do have one)

When I forget why I do what I do, I am tempted to give up. I need to remember to serve, and my way of serving is helping people communicate what they do (or know).

We all have gifts. If we use them well, we can craft a meaningful career, though it may not resemble what the textbooks say a career is supposed to look like. In other words, we don’t all choose a profession, get an entry level position in that field, and then slowly but steadily climb to the top until we are making a comfortable living, then retire and look back with satisfaction on how seamlessly our working years progressed. For many of us, this career thing is a mish-mash mess.

Enter the simply brilliant perspective of Marianne Williamson. As a writer, I’m in awe of her brilliant ability to cut through to the point and say it with beautiful simplicity. “Success,” says Williamson, “means going to sleep at night knowing our talents and abilities were used in a way that served others.”

Williamson goes on to say that what we do is not as important as how (or why) we do it. We should do whatever we do kindly. The key to success is to realize how we are connected—that the purpose of our work lives is not different from the purpose of the rest of our lives. It’s all to spread love.

Does Your Work Spread Love?

For some, it’s a stretch to see one’s job as work that spreads love. And some work does not (in which case the doer may want to consider a change). But every job worth doing has the potential to be done with love. Even if your job is to sell used cars—or carpets—you can do it with love. I mention carpets because I once knew a salesman who was joyfully helping people pick out carpets well into his eighties. That kind of thing can be inspiring.

Whatever you do, you can be kind, honest, and friendly while you do it, and your goal can be both making a profit and helping someone else, whether that person is a customer, client, or coworker. If you are doing your work solely for the profit, you may miss a lot of opportunities spread love. That is, you may miss your purpose.

My goal as an editor and writer is to help people communicate. I enjoy writing about others and helping them polish their work as much as I enjoy crafting my own stories. For the most part, I work in a niche that is easily about love—well-being—but it’s not the only way I use my talents. I’m also a technical editor, and I spend a good amount of time pouring over copy about digital imaging products. How is that about love? Well, the team I work with is a great group of people; for most of us, the work is about supporting each other’s efforts. Our collective goal is to communicate an accurate message.

Before I launched myself as a freelance writer and editor, I was a teacher, an administrative assistant, a nutritionist at an upscale gym, a financial aid counselor, and a research editor. Yes, I’ve had many jobs. In Return to Love, Marianne Williamson says the same of her life.

Marianne also says she’s had many jobs but only one career. I say the same.

The reason I’ve had many jobs (and clients) is I’m continually tweaking my work life to align with purpose. I’m looking for the best way to use my gifts to do what I came here to do—what we all came her to do—spread love and make a difference, no matter how small that difference seems.

If I can do that, I don’t need a bucket list.

 

Advertisements

Hiring a Professional Editor? Here’s What to Expect

writer

If you’re thinking about hiring a professional editor, the first step is to consider your goal. Are you self-publishing a book? Do you want to put your best foot (or word) forward when marketing your well-being service? Do want clickable content that search engines will find and people will read?

Of course, you can do a lot of this on your own. Before you think about paying for help, learn as much as you can about creating sound copy. (If you need some help, you can download my free resource here.)

But we all need help from time to time. Even editors hire editors. (I do!)

How Can an Editor Help You?

Think about what you want help with and set some realistic expectations about the time and cost involved. The most important piece of advice I can give you is find a professional editor who knows about your topic. Better still, find someone with a passion for it! Also be sure to find someone you connect with.

A carefully selected second pair of eyes can cut your workload by more than half, because neither you nor your editor will burn out if you both own the project. You’ll want to be able to work together efficiently. You should enjoy the process and feel supported as well as assisted.

How Quickly Can a Professional Editor Work?

Granted the term professional is not regulated, but there is a wide range of skill when it comes to editors. Keep in mind that fast is not better. (On the other hand, slow doesn’t necessarily mean detailed or thorough.)

Knowing a bit about how editors work can help you decide if you’ve found one worth hiring.

In her book, The Copyeditor’s Handbook, editor and teacher Amy Einsohn, a leader in the field of copyediting, gives the following estimates of a “typical pace for copyediting hard copy.” The estimates are based on two passes (the minimum necessary to do the job well).

Light copyedit: 4-9 pages per hour

Medium copyedit 2-7 pages per hour

Heavy copyedit 1-3 pages per hour

The “pages” Einsohn refers to are manuscript pages, which are typically only 250-325 words in length. (Manuscript pages are double-spaced for ease of editing.)

How Much Should Hiring a Professional Editor Cost?

I recently took a continuing education course in which the topic of fees was raised. According to instructor Jacqueline Landis, an editor with more than 15 years of experience, “The rock-bottom rate for an established editor is $20 per hour for light to medium copyediting. An average rate is $35 per hour, and the top rate ranges from $50 to $75 per hour.” The higher fees are usually for very heavy developmental editing.

If you have a 25,000-word manuscript (approximately 50 single-spaced pages in Times New Roman 12-point font), editing fees can range from $150 to more than $5000! For a typical light to medium edit, expect to pay at least a few hundred dollars for a professional edit.

What do copyeditors do?

So what do you get for your investment in professional editing? The short answer to this question is, “probably more than you realize!” If you are hiring a professional editor, ask about his or her process. Look for clues that the person is a qualified, experienced editor. Here are some questions (and answers) that may help.

1. Does the editor use a style sheet? You shouldn’t have to ask this question, because all professional editors do. In case you’re not aware of this tool of the trade, a style sheet is a form of keeping notes, usually on a chart. The goal is to keep track of anything that may be inconsistent or need attention as the editor reads. Style sheets are crucial to accuracy, as you probably can imagine. For example, while editing a book that is hundreds of pages long, it would be easy to miss that a name is spelled one way on page 3 and another way on page 233 without a style sheet.

Editors also use style sheets to note stylistic preferences. For example, should there be a comma before the conjunction in the last item in a series? (If you were in school more than a few years ago, you may not realize this is now optional.)

2. How many “passes” will the editor do?  “Pass” is editor-speak for reading the manuscript once. As I mentioned before, two passes are the minimum for quality work. In some cases, due to budget or time constraints, an author may request only one, but be aware that it is not reasonable to expect perfection if you do this.

3. How does the editor ensure accuracy? Some tricks of the trade include reading the manuscript out loud, taking a break at least once every two hours, or spending no more than 6 hours editing on a given day (except in emergencies). Yes, we all want things done quickly, but as I said, quick does not mean good. Editing is tedious work. If an editor promises to complete a 300-page manuscript in 3 days, find another editor!

3. Does the editor work on hard copy with traditional proofreaders’ marks or on electronic copy using a feature like Microsoft Word’s Track Changes? If the editor doesn’t know much about either  of these methods, don’t expect professional results.

4. Which style guide does the editor use? There are different guides for different purposes. Some companies have their own house style as well. I use CMOS (The Chicago Manual of Style) or AP (Associated Press) unless a client requests something else. Ask this question to ensure the editor you hire will not simply be working from memory of high school English class.

One quick tidbit before you get out there and find a great editor. There is no consensus on how “copyeditor” should be spelled. CMOS (and I) spell it as one word; AP (the style guide for journalists) spells it as two (copy editor). Go figure!

Not ready to hire an editor? Join my email list and receive access to my free guide that will help you start editing your own work today!

Do You Need an Editor? Here’s How to Find Support For Your Writing Project

meditation for writersRecently, a member of a Facebook group for bloggers posted this question: Who do you use to edit your blog posts? The answers ranged from some type of software to “my mother” to a seasoned pro. Why the disparity? I think because when people use the term “editor,” they tend to use it loosely. So, do you need an editor, or does your project require another kind of service?

What is an editor?

An editor is not a proofreader. Sure, all editors will proofread, but that’s not the focus of their art. And make no mistake, editing is both an art and a science. An editor is also not a ghostwriter, though many editors do ghostwrite as well. (It’s a distinct service.)

Most editing projects float somewhere among the three services I’ve just described. But even if your needs fall squarely within the realm of editing, there is more than one type of service to consider. Most seasoned, professional editors break services into three categories: light editing (which lives at the border of proofreading), moderate editing (also called line editing or copyediting), and substantive editing (which lives at the border of ghostwriting).

Do you need an editor?

Many people ask for proofreading or light editing when they really need something more. Being specific about what you need is not the same thing as being specific about what you want to pay for. If you ask for proofreading but your copy is still in the “rough draft” stage, you’ll need to rethink your strategy.  After all, you wouldn’t hire a painter before you’ve had drywall installed, would you?

Think of an editor as more than someone who will check your grammar and spelling. Yes, you can probably use software for that, though even the best software will miss nuances that make your writing unique. Unless you’re writing academic or technical material, there’s little need to be so “correct” that your writing is boring. Trying to get all the red and green lines in your Word doc to disappear is usually a waste of time (though I’ll admit it is tempting)!

For most writers, especially bloggers and authors who craft pieces to communicate something they’re passionate about, an editor should have at least the following three things to offer.

1. She should know more about grammar, spelling, punctuation, etc. than your friend who was good in English. Ask which style guide she uses, and check out the resource she mentions. Ask what kind of training she has. (I have an eye for detail is not an adequate answer.) This is especially important if you’re writing a book that you would like to market professionally at some point.

2. She should have an editorial process. Unless you simply want a proofreader, your editing project should involve several steps. You should understand how you will participate in the process, and you should be clear on what your editor will and will not do. (Hint: She will not change your voice or rewrite your content unless you ask her to, and she will not act like your high school English teacher!)

3. She should be familiar with your niche or subject. Search for an editor, and you’ll probably find hundreds in no time at all! The icing on the cake if you want the best fit for your project is knowledge of your subject matter. Why? It won’t necessarily cost you more to hire someone familiar with your topic (unless it’s very technical). But you will get more for your money. An editor who knows your audience will serve not only as a grammar geek who can ensure that your copy flows well, but she will also stand in for your readers. She’ll understand what you’re trying to communicate, and she’ll be able to suggest when your message isn’t clear.

A good editor with experience in your niche is an ally for both you and your readers. She’ll help you when you’re stuck on a way to find the words for something you’re passionate about because she is passionate about the same thing! For example, my clients who are nutritionists, health coaches, life coaches, personal trainers, therapists, and yoga teachers are comfortable working with me because they know I’ve read hundreds of pages of content on these topics. I know what’s out there, how to make their project unique, and how to make sure it’s on par with content that works for other well-being professionals.

What does a good editor cost?

Again, there’s no simple answer to this question. A good place to start is the Editorial Freelancers Association’s rate sheet. You can find it here.

High quality editing doesn’t have to cost a fortune, but don’t expect it to be cheap either. You truly will get what you pay for. Look for someone who is reasonably priced, but understand that editing is not as simple as many people think. If you’re in doubt about what you’ll get for your money, ask for a free sample edit. Most editors will provide one.

If you’re lucky enough to find someone who values her own abilities as well as yours—in other words, if your editor is passionate enough about what you do to see beyond dollar signs, but also a consummate professional—you’ve got a keeper. Respect for each other is the key to a professional relationship that goes beyond spell-checking and “correcting” your work.

So, do you need an editor, or is your project safe in your roommate’s hands? Only you can decide!

Not ready to hire an editor? Join my email list and receive access to my free guide that will help you start editing your own work today!

Content Marketing for Your Well-being Business: 5 Types of Content to Try

content-marketing

If you’re in the well-being niche, content marketing may not be on your radar. In fact, marketing in general is probably not what you love most about your work. You want to be teaching yoga, helping clients improve their diets, or facilitating an awesome reiki healing.

Take heart. Marketing does not have to be something you dread, so don’t think of it in a negative way. Marketing is nothing more than getting the word out that you have something of value to share with the world. In fact, one effective way to market is in part a type of service itself. It’s called content marketing and it works.

I’m not just telling you this because content creation is one of the services I provide (though, of course, I won’t complain if you want to hire me). I’ve gotten more involved in content marketing because my clients want me to help them do it. They want to do it because it works. So I’m sharing this with you so you can do it too!

What is Content Marketing?

Content marketing is a way to stay connected online with people who care about what you do. It’s not cold calling or spamming; it’s giving current and prospective students or clients information they need or want. That doesn’t simply mean giving away your services for free, though. Content marketing is about establishing relationships through writing.

And it’s awesome!

How Can Well-being Professionals Use Content Marketing?

contentIt’s simple. Create content and share it online. Well, it’s not exactly simple, but it is fun. You get to create content that shares something of value that you are passionate about and then find ways to get it in front of people who want it and can benefit from it.

Getting your content out there is a subject for another post. For now, let’s look at the different types of content you can—and should—create and distribute.

5 Types of Content Marketing Pieces for Marketing Your Yoga or Well-being Service

1. A Blog

As I’ve taken more content marketing workshops and webinars and read more and more books and articles about it, one thing comes up over and over again. You must have a blog! Websites with blogs are much more likely to be noticed, visited, visited again and again, and trusted.

If you don’t have a blog, the first thing you need to do is create one! Then decide what kind of content you will post, who will write the content, and how you will get that content distributed to people who will eventually become your students and clients (hint: you can do this via social media).

The most important things to know about using your blog as a marketing tool are you must update it regularly and you must make your posts search engine friend; that is, you must understand how people search for content and how to write yours so it’s more likely to be found and appreciated.

Don’t know how to do that? Don’t worry. There are people who can help you.

2. A Newsletter

In a survey conducted in 2012, more than half of business owners said that their newsletter was the best content marketing tool they used. If you subscribe to newsletters, you’ve probably noticed many of them contain the same, or same type, of content as blogs. The difference is the content is delivered to your inbox rather than you having to go to the blog to read it.

Newsletters are best for practitioners and teachers who often have events to publicize or new classes or services to announce. They also work well for sharing larger industry trends. For example, if you are a nutritionist, you might distribute a newsletter to explain a health study that’s been all over the news recently, or if you are a yoga instructor, your newsletter might highlight the life of a guru whose birthday is happening this month. Newsletters are also great tools for sharing holiday recipes or tips for developing a home yoga practice.

3. Free Guides, Special Reports, or White Papers

Sometimes known as hub pieces, guides, reports, and white papers are usually longer pieces that readers can turn to often as a resource. Offering a free guide or report to readers serves a few valuable purposes. First, it puts your content (and you) in readers’ hands for an extended period of time. Second, it positions you as an expert in your niche. Third, it’s a great tool you can build other campaigns around. You can write blogs and articles related to the content in your giveaway piece, or you can create a series of emails.

Which brings us to the fourth type of marketing content.

4. Emails

There are different ways to use email for content marketing. Industry experts say the most effective is a drip series. A drip series is a series of emails sent out over a certain period of time to share information related to a certain topic.

A yoga teacher might do a drip series on the chakras, for example, while a nutritionist could write a series of emails giving people tips for lowering blood sugar or understanding essential nutrients in more depth. A health coach might do a series on natural ways to manage stress.

As I mentioned, a drip series is often tied to a longer guide or special report created as a giveaway for anyone interested in your work.

5. Social Media Updates

Facebook shares, Tweets, Linked In updates and the like are also important parts of an overall content marketing strategy. Which platform or platforms you choose depends on the type of service you offer.

While social media content is usually easiest and quickest to create, it won’t do much good alone. The purpose of social media marketing is to develop and maintain relationships. You want to connect with people who visit your website, read your blog, or request your content. And the purpose of having people do all of those things is to nurture relationships that turn leads into clients or students.

Since the vast majority of people use some form of social media on a regular basis, you’ll have access to the largest pool of potential students or clients via social media platforms.

Other Types of Content Marketing to Consider

You don’t have to limit your marketing to content people read. Videos, podcasts, and infographics are also great tools, though they may be more difficult and costly to create.

Videos are especially good tools for yoga instructors. You can create a short piece to demonstrate a series of poses or to highlight your teaching style. If you are a health coach, you can create a podcast or infographic to explain a concept or give health tips.

Overwhelmed? Don’t Be

As you can see, there are lots of ways to use content marketing to stay connected with people who may be interested in taking your classes, hiring you as a consultant, or using your well-being service.

Do you need to use them all to be successful? No, you don’t. Pick one or two to start and focus your efforts there. Before you know it, your network of readers, followers, and colleagues will grow.

You never know when one of these leads will become a paying student or client, but until then, enjoy the journey of sharing what you have to offer and getting the word out about how you can help others live a better life.

Would you like more help with content marketing for your well-being business? Join my email list and receive access to my free guide that will help you start editing your own work today!

 

Writing Shareable Content Can Help Your Well-being Business Thrive

As a writer and editor whose niche is well-being, I’ve got a network of wellness providers whose work I love. They are health coaches, fitness gurus, nutritionists, healers, spiritual leaders, and yoga teachers. When I speak to them or take their classes, I’m inspired, sometimes even in awe. But in some cases, when I read their blogs, websites, or newsletters, I’m not as quick to gush. Is writing shareable content important to the success of your well-being business? It might be, and here’s why.

Writing shareable content in the well-being niche 

It’s one thing to post mediocre content or send out an unedited email to your students, clients, and followers. After all, they already love you. Maybe they don’t care if your writing lacks clarity or the ability to engage a reader. But here’s something to consider: Is your content shareable? Getting people to share your content is a critical piece of the marketing puzzle. It’s amazing how easily content can spread through cyberspace, and how easily (more often), it can get ignored.

I’m aware of this because I manage a few social media pages for clients with a good number of followers. I’m always looking for great content to share. I know more than one well-being rock star whose content I’d share in a second if only it were polished just a bit more. As a professional working for others, I hesitate to share something unless it’s on par with what I’ve been hired to produce, or in the case of social media management, share.

My point? If you’re going to be out there in print, put your best foot (or paragraph) forward. It matters more than you think. There are dozens of people sifting through posts, blogs, and websites deciding what to share and what not to share.

How can you ensure your content passes muster?

The easiest way, of course, is to hire a professional writer so you can focus your attention on serving your clients and running your business. But if you don’t have the budget or inclination to hire a writer, there are a few other things you can do.

1. Read and share. Read blogs, websites, and newsletters from your favorite brands, and share the ones that inspire you. The more you read great writing, the more adept you’ll become at writing shareable content yourself. Sharing content also makes it more likely that your content will be shared, as those in your network are likely to return the favor when they like something you write or post.

2. Take a writing class or hire a coach. While you’ll still have to pay for a class or writing coach, once you’ve learned a few tricks of the trade, you’ll be able to write shareable content on your own.

3. Consider working with an editor or proofreader, and be sure the person you hire understands your business well. In most cases, having someone look over your copy or polish your rough draft will be more cost effective than hiring a writer to research and write from scratch. One thing to consider here is niche. An editor who understands what you do will work more effectively and efficiently than one who has to learn a lot about your business in order to shape your message.

4. Put your work aside for a day. Good writers and editors know it’s best to sleep on a piece and read it again with fresh eyes before posting it or sending it out. And here’s a related trick of the trade: Read the post, article, or email out loud. You’ll be much more likely to catch errors, awkward phrasing, and other issues if you actually hear the words as well as read them.

Why Writing Shareable Content Really Matters

I recently worked with a wonderful health coach who had a great new product to sell. This man inspires everyone he works with. He’s open, engaging, intelligent, and  able to change people’s lives. But the content he’d written to promote his product was riddled with grammatical errors, awkward phrasing, and a few statements regarding nutritional content that were not correct. Unfortunately, that content did not translate into sales.

Why do I tell you this? Because you too can change the world with your gift of teaching yoga, advocating for the environment, coaching people in matters of fitness and natural healing, or promoting a clean, healthy diet. You are busy being good at what you do, so you may not have the time to write about it in a way that will engage readers and turn them into customers, students, or clients.

But people want to read about your work, and the place they’re most likely to read about it is online—on your website or blog, in an email, or via a newsletter.Make sure your content reflects your greatness. People do judge your business and your professionalism by the quality of your writing.

Chose words that bring forth your brilliance and shine a light on your gifts. It’s subtle, but just a few badly written sentences can turn people away from your message, and they won’t necessarily know the reason for their lack of interest.

I am not saying you need to be perfect! Please don’t misunderstand. I don’t want you to lose sight of the spirit of your message because you’re consumed with finding every spelling error or missing comma in your work. Just have an eye for quality, because it matters as much in your written presentation as it does in other aspects of your business.

The value of writing shareable content

To understand the value of writing shareable content, let’s go back to my client with the great product to sell. As I mentioned, he was giving away a short promotional e-book, but few people were following up and buying the product he was promoting.

So we edited the content, a project that cost the equivalent of four sales of his product.

The e-book went viral and sales took off. Several years later, I’m told sales are still booming. The revised e-book has brought in many more than four additional sales.

Why I do what I do

I write work with wellness professionals because health of mind, body, and spirit is my passion. What better way to use my calling then by partnering with those who share my passion for yoga, nutrition, fitness, psychology, spirituality, and holistic health? My clients and I work together to change the world—one inspired and carefully crafted sentence at a time!

Would you like help with content marketing for your well-being business? Join my email list and get access to my resource library, which includes content you can start using today. I’ll also send you my free guide to editing your own work so you can save time and reduce the cost of partnering with a professional content creator.

Would You Like to Join a Circle of Yoga Friends?

yoga friends

As many of my yogi friends know, I’m working on a project called Yoga Circles, a guide for small groups of yogis who want to meet, talk about yoga philosophy, share the joys and frustrations of the practice, try new things, socialize, and have some fun!

To give you a better idea of what the project is all about, you can download an excerpt of the book here!

If you’re interested in receiving a free preview of the entire manuscript, please contact me. I’m looking for beta readers. All I ask is that you read it and let me know your thoughts. All suggestions are welcome!

Has yoga changed your life? Would you like to write about it? I’m also looking for people who would like to contribute stories of transformation through yoga to be included in the book. If you’re interested, you can download more information below, contact me via Facebook, or email me: maria@wellbeingwriter.net.

CONTRIBUTE A STORY

Thank you! Om shanti.

%d bloggers like this: