Well-being Business Content Marketing: Part One—Who Are You and Who Are You Becoming?

explore create inspireLately, I’ve spoken with a lot of wellness professionals who are wondering what to do next. A yoga teacher wants to write a book. A personal trainer is thinking about blogging. Another yoga teacher wants to get certified to teach Pilates, and a nutritionist is branching into holistic health coaching, so she can focus on the mind and emotions as well as diet and exercise.

The great thing about wellness is the possibilities for growth are endless. I’m working with a coach right now who has just been through a series of certifications so she can do wellness counseling. She’s also a writer, and the project we’re working on is a book to supplement her counseling and position her as an expert in the field.

Today I met a young woman who described herself as a “holistic wellness junkie” and a “hippie.” She was wondering how to focus her passion as an entrepreneur.

First Steps First: Defining Your Well-being Business or Service

Before you can create content for your well-being business or service, you need to know what that business or service is. Sounds obvious, I know, but most of us evolve, and as we do so, we become a slightly different version of our former selves.

Are you a yoga teacher? What sets you apart from all the others? Maybe it’s your love of restorative yoga or your ability to inspire others to become more powerful. Maybe devotion to classical yoga is your ID. Or perhaps you’re ready to offer videos of your classes or write a book about how yoga changed your life.

Did you begin your career as a nutritionist? Your next step may be holistic health coaching that focuses not only on food but on the mind, emotions, and physical fitness. What tools will you create to reach that goal?

Do you want to connect with your tribe via email marketing or is blogging your thing? Helping people grow their own well-being business may be next for you. Or perhaps you offer complementary healing services, like reiki or aromatherapy in addition to teaching yoga.

I worked with a personal trainer who created his own vegan protein powder and became a new kind of entrepreneur. Another client turned a passion for yoga into a business selling yoga and aromatherapy products.

Let Your Passion Lead You

Last winter, we had a blizzard in the northeast. The yoga studio where I practice was closed, but one of teachers posted a YouTube video on Facebook so we could all practice at home. It was wonderful! I wouldn’t be surprised if the next step in her career is creating more videos and DVDs.

The point is if you tune in and follow that voice that led you to a career in wellness to begin with, it will continue to lead you. What would you like to create next?

Content is King

If you market online, you’ve heard it said that content is king. To be honest, I’m a little tired of hearing that. Obviously, your online presence depends on something your audience can read, hear, or see. The problem is there’s so much to read, hear, and see these days that a lot goes unnoticed.

The real question is how can you stand out? Here are a few ways to start with:

  1. Be sure your content is relevant to your audience. So, this means not only defining what you do but who you do it for. Be as specific as possible.
  2. Create content your audience can respond to. Engage them. Make them want to comment, share, and follow you. That may mean testing different formats—written posts, images, quotes, videos, etc.—to see what resonates with your tribe.
  3. Know why you’re creating. The content you offer online is probably not your end goal. You want to get people interested in your services, your classes, your book, or your paid courses, right? People you meet online may not become students, readers, or clients overnight—or even ever—but they’ll be aware of what you do and may refer others to you.
  4. Get help if you need it. Don’t be afraid to ask for help. No one is successful alone. If you find assistants you connect with and trust, you may end up with much more than a better product and more successful business. You’ll also have the opportunity to form valuable relationships with like-minded wellness entrepreneurs. The value of good relationships really cannot be overstated!
  5. Help others. Join networking groups and share your knowledge. You’ll be surprised how much people appreciate a tip or answered question that takes only a few minutes of your time. That time will pay off. You never know when someone you’ve helped will need your services or know someone else who needs them.

I hope these words will help you move along the path of your dreams. I’d love to learn what you’re creating, and so would others, I’m sure. Please share your thoughts in the comments, and let’s see how we can help each other move forward!

 

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Do You Need an Editor? Here’s How to Find Support For Your Writing Project

meditation for writersRecently, a member of a Facebook group for bloggers posted this question: Who do you use to edit your blog posts? The answers ranged from some type of software to “my mother” to a seasoned pro. Why the disparity? I think because when people use the term “editor,” they tend to use it loosely. So, do you need an editor, or does your project require another kind of service?

What is an editor?

An editor is not a proofreader. Sure, all editors will proofread, but that’s not the focus of their art. And make no mistake, editing is both an art and a science. An editor is also not a ghostwriter, though many editors do ghostwrite as well. (It’s a distinct service.)

Most editing projects float somewhere among the three services I’ve just described. But even if your needs fall squarely within the realm of editing, there is more than one type of service to consider. Most seasoned, professional editors break services into three categories: light editing (which lives at the border of proofreading), moderate editing (also called line editing or copyediting), and substantive editing (which lives at the border of ghostwriting).

Do you need an editor?

Many people ask for proofreading or light editing when they really need something more. Being specific about what you need is not the same thing as being specific about what you want to pay for. If you ask for proofreading but your copy is still in the “rough draft” stage, you’ll need to rethink your strategy.  After all, you wouldn’t hire a painter before you’ve had drywall installed, would you?

Think of an editor as more than someone who will check your grammar and spelling. Yes, you can probably use software for that, though even the best software will miss nuances that make your writing unique. Unless you’re writing academic or technical material, there’s little need to be so “correct” that your writing is boring. Trying to get all the red and green lines in your Word doc to disappear is usually a waste of time (though I’ll admit it is tempting)!

For most writers, especially bloggers and authors who craft pieces to communicate something they’re passionate about, an editor should have at least the following three things to offer.

1. She should know more about grammar, spelling, punctuation, etc. than your friend who was good in English. Ask which style guide she uses, and check out the resource she mentions. Ask what kind of training she has. (I have an eye for detail is not an adequate answer.) This is especially important if you’re writing a book that you would like to market professionally at some point.

2. She should have an editorial process. Unless you simply want a proofreader, your editing project should involve several steps. You should understand how you will participate in the process, and you should be clear on what your editor will and will not do. (Hint: She will not change your voice or rewrite your content unless you ask her to, and she will not act like your high school English teacher!)

3. She should be familiar with your niche or subject. Search for an editor, and you’ll probably find hundreds in no time at all! The icing on the cake if you want the best fit for your project is knowledge of your subject matter. Why? It won’t necessarily cost you more to hire someone familiar with your topic (unless it’s very technical). But you will get more for your money. An editor who knows your audience will serve not only as a grammar geek who can ensure that your copy flows well, but she will also stand in for your readers. She’ll understand what you’re trying to communicate, and she’ll be able to suggest when your message isn’t clear.

A good editor with experience in your niche is an ally for both you and your readers. She’ll help you when you’re stuck on a way to find the words for something you’re passionate about because she is passionate about the same thing! For example, my clients who are nutritionists, health coaches, life coaches, personal trainers, therapists, and yoga teachers are comfortable working with me because they know I’ve read hundreds of pages of content on these topics. I know what’s out there, how to make their project unique, and how to make sure it’s on par with content that works for other well-being professionals.

What does a good editor cost?

Again, there’s no simple answer to this question. A good place to start is the Editorial Freelancers Association’s rate sheet. You can find it here.

High quality editing doesn’t have to cost a fortune, but don’t expect it to be cheap either. You truly will get what you pay for. Look for someone who is reasonably priced, but understand that editing is not as simple as many people think. If you’re in doubt about what you’ll get for your money, ask for a free sample edit. Most editors will provide one.

If you’re lucky enough to find someone who values her own abilities as well as yours—in other words, if your editor is passionate enough about what you do to see beyond dollar signs, but also a consummate professional—you’ve got a keeper. Respect for each other is the key to a professional relationship that goes beyond spell-checking and “correcting” your work.

So, do you need an editor, or is your project safe in your roommate’s hands? Only you can decide!

Not ready to hire an editor? Join my email list and receive access to my free guide that will help you start editing your own work today!

Writing Shareable Content Can Help Your Well-being Business Thrive

As a writer and editor whose niche is well-being, I’ve got a network of wellness providers whose work I love. They are health coaches, fitness gurus, nutritionists, healers, spiritual leaders, and yoga teachers. When I speak to them or take their classes, I’m inspired, sometimes even in awe. But in some cases, when I read their blogs, websites, or newsletters, I’m not as quick to gush. Is writing shareable content important to the success of your well-being business? It might be, and here’s why.

Writing shareable content in the well-being niche 

It’s one thing to post mediocre content or send out an unedited email to your students, clients, and followers. After all, they already love you. Maybe they don’t care if your writing lacks clarity or the ability to engage a reader. But here’s something to consider: Is your content shareable? Getting people to share your content is a critical piece of the marketing puzzle. It’s amazing how easily content can spread through cyberspace, and how easily (more often), it can get ignored.

I’m aware of this because I manage a few social media pages for clients with a good number of followers. I’m always looking for great content to share. I know more than one well-being rock star whose content I’d share in a second if only it were polished just a bit more. As a professional working for others, I hesitate to share something unless it’s on par with what I’ve been hired to produce, or in the case of social media management, share.

My point? If you’re going to be out there in print, put your best foot (or paragraph) forward. It matters more than you think. There are dozens of people sifting through posts, blogs, and websites deciding what to share and what not to share.

How can you ensure your content passes muster?

The easiest way, of course, is to hire a professional writer so you can focus your attention on serving your clients and running your business. But if you don’t have the budget or inclination to hire a writer, there are a few other things you can do.

1. Read and share. Read blogs, websites, and newsletters from your favorite brands, and share the ones that inspire you. The more you read great writing, the more adept you’ll become at writing shareable content yourself. Sharing content also makes it more likely that your content will be shared, as those in your network are likely to return the favor when they like something you write or post.

2. Take a writing class or hire a coach. While you’ll still have to pay for a class or writing coach, once you’ve learned a few tricks of the trade, you’ll be able to write shareable content on your own.

3. Consider working with an editor or proofreader, and be sure the person you hire understands your business well. In most cases, having someone look over your copy or polish your rough draft will be more cost effective than hiring a writer to research and write from scratch. One thing to consider here is niche. An editor who understands what you do will work more effectively and efficiently than one who has to learn a lot about your business in order to shape your message.

4. Put your work aside for a day. Good writers and editors know it’s best to sleep on a piece and read it again with fresh eyes before posting it or sending it out. And here’s a related trick of the trade: Read the post, article, or email out loud. You’ll be much more likely to catch errors, awkward phrasing, and other issues if you actually hear the words as well as read them.

Why Writing Shareable Content Really Matters

I recently worked with a wonderful health coach who had a great new product to sell. This man inspires everyone he works with. He’s open, engaging, intelligent, and  able to change people’s lives. But the content he’d written to promote his product was riddled with grammatical errors, awkward phrasing, and a few statements regarding nutritional content that were not correct. Unfortunately, that content did not translate into sales.

Why do I tell you this? Because you too can change the world with your gift of teaching yoga, advocating for the environment, coaching people in matters of fitness and natural healing, or promoting a clean, healthy diet. You are busy being good at what you do, so you may not have the time to write about it in a way that will engage readers and turn them into customers, students, or clients.

But people want to read about your work, and the place they’re most likely to read about it is online—on your website or blog, in an email, or via a newsletter.Make sure your content reflects your greatness. People do judge your business and your professionalism by the quality of your writing.

Chose words that bring forth your brilliance and shine a light on your gifts. It’s subtle, but just a few badly written sentences can turn people away from your message, and they won’t necessarily know the reason for their lack of interest.

I am not saying you need to be perfect! Please don’t misunderstand. I don’t want you to lose sight of the spirit of your message because you’re consumed with finding every spelling error or missing comma in your work. Just have an eye for quality, because it matters as much in your written presentation as it does in other aspects of your business.

The value of writing shareable content

To understand the value of writing shareable content, let’s go back to my client with the great product to sell. As I mentioned, he was giving away a short promotional e-book, but few people were following up and buying the product he was promoting.

So we edited the content, a project that cost the equivalent of four sales of his product.

The e-book went viral and sales took off. Several years later, I’m told sales are still booming. The revised e-book has brought in many more than four additional sales.

Why I do what I do

I write work with wellness professionals because health of mind, body, and spirit is my passion. What better way to use my calling then by partnering with those who share my passion for yoga, nutrition, fitness, psychology, spirituality, and holistic health? My clients and I work together to change the world—one inspired and carefully crafted sentence at a time!

Would you like help with content marketing for your well-being business? Join my email list and get access to my resource library, which includes content you can start using today. I’ll also send you my free guide to editing your own work so you can save time and reduce the cost of partnering with a professional content creator.

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